Cameron’s supposed challenge to free movement in the EU is going nowhere

On the day when much of the world lost all sense of perspective and proportionality, to beatify by acclaim the media constructed legend of Nelson Mandela, the outcome of discussions that directly impact on the lives of Britons – and therefore matters rather more – was quietly released.

Home Affairs ministers from around the bloc have taken note of the European Commission’s communication on ‘the free movement of EU citizens’ and responded to it, making clear that.

The overwhelming majority of member states agreed that the free movement of persons is a core principle of the European Union and a fundamental right of all  EU citizens that should be upheld and promoted. They also agreed that individual cases of abuse have to be combated within the existing legal framework and in cooperation with local authorities in the member states.

Moreover, the Visegrad countries (Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia) circulated a joint statement on this issue (17395/13), considering that the selective  application of core freedoms by member states leads to an erosion of the single market.

This, coupled with the process of qualified majority voting, means Cameron’s attempt at a putsch to dilute one of the European project’s four fundamental freedoms is dead before it even gets out of the gate.

As if to reinforce the point – and provide a timely reminder that many of the worst impacts of mass migration here are the result of the UK government failing to use powers at its disposal – the ministers, whose UK representatives were Chris Grayling and Theresa May, generously suggested actions that should be carried out instead:

In order to help national and local authorities to effectively apply EU free movement rules, the document presents five concrete actions to be implemented together with member states:

– helping member states to fight marriages of convenience (handbook);
– helping authorities to apply EU social security coordination rules (practical guide);
– helping authorities to meet social inclusion challenges (funding);
– exchange of best practices between local authorities;
– training and support of local authorities in applying the EU free movement rules.

From a democracy perspective this is valuable and instructive, as another example of how the EU circumvents national governments and talks directly to local authorities to ensures they deliver what the EU wants at a local level.  This sees to it there is no need to overcome potential resistance from Parliaments.  Westminster will therefore once again be by bypassed as our supreme government talks to the lowest levels of government and hands them their orders – which are enthusiastically followed by pro-EU council officers.

Of course, voters in local elections are never asked if they agree with what their local authorities plan to do on their behalf in respect of dealing with immigration.  They are not even told what measures will be taken or how many tax pounds will be allocated for this work, let alone have any say in what actually happens, or any veto over it.  Despite this people still witter on about this country being a ‘democracy’.

The media will not report this.  The Cameroon sycophants will ignore it, as they ignore everything that challenges their inaccurate beliefs and delusional shibboleths.  Most people will know nothing about it.  Rather than focus on how we are ruled and decisions are made without our consent, time and money is devoted to lauding a man who used violence to help achieve his ends – with one increasingly unhinged commentator even drawing comparisons between Mandela and Jesus Christ.

Perhaps the solution is for people to use social media to start sharing information like this that the media deliberately withholds from the public, and stop simply being used by the media to link to stories it has chosen to cover in pursuit of an agenda that serves interests other than ours.

5 Responses to “Cameron’s supposed challenge to free movement in the EU is going nowhere”


  1. 1 martinbrumby 07/12/2013 at 11:13 am

    Interesting that the “Visegrad countries (Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia)” are those (but excepting Romania) with the biggest problems with the socially alienated Roma community.
    Is this significant, perhaps?
    I’ve been to Visegrad but have never before heard of this grouping.
    When you see how the Roma live / are treated in all these countries (and Romania), but especially in Slovakia, then you can see that there are two sides to this particular problem, which is a challenging issue that the media and politicos always avoid like the plague.
    Sorry to comment on an issue tangential to the thrust of your posting, which seems absolutely right.
    Not for the first time (or the last), one wonders whether Cameron even realises that the stuff he spouts is nonsense. He certainly doesn’t seem to appreciate some of the important nuances of the migration debate.

  2. 2 cosmic 07/12/2013 at 1:47 pm

    Martin Brumby,

    “Not for the first time (or the last), one wonders whether Cameron even realises that the stuff he spouts is nonsense.”

    I’ve often wondered about this.

    I’ve come to the conclusion that he’s like a priest who embraces certain doctrines, patters off standard prayers and enacts rituals. What he thinks about any of these things and indeed, whether he has any opinion at all on them, doesn’t come into it.

  3. 3 DICK R 07/12/2013 at 7:09 pm

    Maybe they deserve to be treated that way

  4. 4 Doug McGregor 07/12/2013 at 9:13 pm

    Comments closed at DT , need more be said?

  5. 5 Doug McGregor 07/12/2013 at 9:24 pm

    People have been conditioned not to think. When their palliatives are denied to them , will it be too late for them? I see sheep , sheepdog and pens but where is the lamp post for the whistler?


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